Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Public Health. 2005 Aug;95(8):1396-402. Epub 2005 Jun 28.

Socioeconomic position in childhood and early adult life and risk of mortality: a prospective study of the mothers of the 1958 British birth cohort.

Author information

1
Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford St, London WC1N 1EH, England. c.power@ich.ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to establish whether women's childhood socioeconomic position influenced their risk of mortality separately from the effects of adult socioeconomic position.

METHODS:

We examined 11855 British women aged 14 to 49 years, with mortality follow-up over a 45-year period.

RESULTS:

Trends according to childhood social class were observed for all-cause mortality, circulatory disease, coronary heart disease, respiratory disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, lung cancer, and stomach cancer, with higher death rates among members of unskilled manual groups. Associations attenuated after adjustment for adult social class, smoking, and body mass index. No trend was seen for breast cancer or accidents and violence. Adverse social conditions in both childhood and adulthood were associated with higher death rates from coronary heart disease and respiratory disease. Stomach cancer was influenced primarily by childhood conditions and lung cancer by factors in adult life.

CONCLUSIONS:

Socioeconomic position in childhood was associated with adult mortality in a large sample of British women.

PMID:
15985645
PMCID:
PMC1449372
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2004.047340
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center