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Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 27;165(12):1388-94.

Effect of lowering of homocysteine levels on inflammatory markers: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, and Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences, Wageningen, the Netherlands. jane.durga@wur.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Elevated concentrations of homocysteine and low concentrations of folate may lead to a proinflammatory state that could explain their relation to vascular disease risk. We investigated the effect of lowering homocysteine concentrations by means of folic acid supplementation on markers of inflammation.

METHODS:

In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial among 530 men and postmenopausal women with homocysteine concentrations of 1.8 mg/L or higher (>/=13 micromol/L) at screening, we investigated the effect of folic acid supplementation (0.8 mg/d) vs placebo for 1 year on serum concentrations of C-reactive protein, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and autoantibodies against oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

RESULTS:

After 1 year of supplementation, concentrations of serum folate increased by 400% (95% confidence interval [CI], 362%-436%), and those of homocysteine decreased by 28% (95% CI, 24%-36%) in the folic acid group compared with the placebo group. However, no changes in plasma concentrations of the inflammatory markers were observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although homocysteine is associated with vascular disease risk in the general population, marked lowering of slightly elevated homocysteine concentrations by means of 1-year folic acid supplementation does not influence inflammatory responses involving C-reactive protein, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and autoantibodies against oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

PMID:
15983288
DOI:
10.1001/archinte.165.12.1388
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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