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J Antimicrob Chemother. 2005 Aug;56(2):413-5. Epub 2005 Jun 24.

Colicins prevent colonization of urinary catheters.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Infectious Diseases Section, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. trautner@bcm.tmc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Natural microbial defence systems, such as bacteriocins, may be a novel means to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection. We investigated in vitro whether a colicin-expressing strain of Escherichia coli could prevent urinary catheter colonization by a colicin-susceptible, uropathgenic strain of E. coli.

METHODS:

Segments of urinary catheter were inoculated with colicin-producing E. coli K-12 and then exposed to either colicin-susceptible E. coli (a uropathogenic clinical isolate) or colicin-resistant E. coli (derived from the susceptible clinical isolate). Catheters were then incubated overnight, rinsed and sonicated.

RESULTS:

The presence of colicin-producing E. coli K-12 on the catheter surface completely prevented catheter colonization by colicin-susceptible E. coli but not by resistant E. coli. The colicin-susceptible strain but not the colicin-resistant strain also disappeared from broth cultures in the presence of colicin-producing E. coli K-12.

CONCLUSIONS:

The observed inhibition of catheter colonization by the uropathogenic clinical isolate of E. coli can be attributed to the presence of a colicin-producing strain of E. coli on the catheter surface. Bacteriocin production by a non-pathogenic organism may have clinical applicability as a means to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

PMID:
15980093
PMCID:
PMC2077848
DOI:
10.1093/jac/dki228
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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