Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Epilepsy Behav. 2005 Aug;7(1):106-15.

Stigma and safe havens: a medical sociological perspective on African-American female epilepsy patients.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA. apaschal@kumc.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Very little is known about the attitudes and behaviors of minorities with epilepsy. This pilot study explored access to health care, help-seeking behaviors, and adherence to treatment among African-American females with epilepsy.

METHODS:

Ethnographic interviews were conducted with 10 African-American female adults.

RESULTS:

Findings indicate four major obstacles to care: limited financial resources, lack of knowledge about epilepsy among African-Americans, poor patient-provider communication, and lack of social support. Social support impacted individuals seeking surgery, and also affected purchasing medication, adherence to medical treatment, and needed transportation. Lack of knowledge and misinformation about epilepsy in the African-American community and poor communication with physicians contribute to the social stigma felt by these patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

The behavioral epidemiology of epilepsy among African-Americans is lacking. This disease exacerbates health disparities for this population. These findings point to a need for a safe haven for these individuals.

PMID:
15961348
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2005.03.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center