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AIDS. 2005 Jul 1;19(10):1091-6.

SEN virus has an adverse effect on the survival of HIV-positive patients.

Author information

1
Clinic for Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infections bInstitute of Virology, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. sagir@med.uni-duesseldorf.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patients infected with HIV are often coinfected with other viruses.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the effect of SEN virus (SENV) strains D and H on mortality in HIV-positive patients.

METHODS:

A total of 217 HIV-positive patients were analysed retrospectively after first presentation and blood sampling (January 1997 to July 1997) and the effect of coinfection with SENV-D and SENV-H on survival was examined. Analysis periods were the time from blood sampling to the end of follow-up, and the time from diagnosis of HIV infection to the end of study follow-up. SENV-H DNA was measured quantitatively. Prevalences of SENV-D and SENV-H were compared with those in 112 healthy blood donors.

RESULTS:

SENV prevalence was significantly higher in HIV-positive patients than in controls (56/217 and 12/112, respectively; P < 0.001). SENV positivity had no influence on survival, but a significant negative influence of SENV-H on survival was observed when SENV-H DNA was > 530 copies/ml, which was the mean SENV-H DNA level found in HIV-negative controls. This adverse effect was found for both studied time periods in a Kaplan-Meier analyses. A multivariate Cox regression analysis, including CD4 cell count, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stage, age, sex, HIV RNA, highly active antiretroviral therapy and hepatitis C virus status, revealed that a high SENV DNA level was an independent risk factor or indicator for adverse disease outcome.

CONCLUSION:

SENV infection is common in HIV-positive patients. High SENV-H DNA levels were predictive for poor survival in HIV-positive patients.

PMID:
15958841
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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