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J Proteome Res. 2005 May-Jun;4(3):709-18.

Global whole-cell FTICR mass spectrometric proteomics analysis of the heat shock response in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

Author information

1
Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2125, USA. aschmid@systemsbiology.org

Abstract

The results of previous studies indicated that D. radiodurans mounts a regulated protective response to heat shock, and that expression of more than 130 genes, including classical chaperones such as the groESL and dnaKJ operons and proteases such as clpB are induced in response to elevated temperature. In addition, previous qualitative whole-cell mass spectrometric studies conducted under heat shock conditions indicated global changes in the D. radiodurans proteome. To enable the discovery of novel heat shock inducible proteins as well as gain greater biological insight into the classical heat shock response at the protein level, we undertook the global whole-cell FTICR mass spectrometric proteomics study reported here. We have greatly increased the power of this approach by conducting a large number of replicate experiments in addition to taking a semiquantitative approach to data analysis, finding good reproducibility between replicates. Through this analysis, we have identified with high confidence a core set of classical heat shock proteins whose expression increases dramatically and reproducibly in response to elevated temperature. In addition, we have found that the heat shock proteome includes a large number of induced proteins that have not been identified previously as heat responsive, and have therefore been designated as candidate responders. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that elevated temperature stress could lead to cross-protection against other related stresses.

PMID:
15952717
DOI:
10.1021/pr049815n
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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