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Cancer Cell. 2005 Jun;7(6):505-12.

What has senescence got to do with cancer?

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Biology, Department of Medicine, ENH Research Institute, and Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 1001 University Place, Evanston, IL 60201, USA. gdimri@enh.org

Abstract

Cancer therapeutics are primarily thought to work by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells. However, various tumor suppressors and oncogenes have been shown to regulate senescence in normal cells, and senescence bypass appears to be an important step in the development of cancer. Cellular senescence limits the replicative capacity of cells, thus preventing the proliferation of cells that are at different stages of malignancy. A recent body of evidence suggests that induction of senescence can be exploited as a basis for cancer therapy.

PMID:
15950900
PMCID:
PMC1769521
DOI:
10.1016/j.ccr.2005.05.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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