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Mycorrhiza. 2005 Nov;15(8):571-579. doi: 10.1007/s00572-005-0364-3. Epub 2005 Nov 9.

The mycorrhizal community in a forest chronosequence of Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] in Northern England.

Author information

1
Animal and Plant Sciences Department, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S102TN, South Yorkshire, UK. gpalfner@gmail.com.
2
Departamento de Botánica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Oceanográficas, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción, VIII Región, Chile. gpalfner@gmail.com.
3
Departamento de Botánica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Oceanográficas, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción, VIII Región, Chile.
4
Animal and Plant Sciences Department, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S102TN, South Yorkshire, UK.

Abstract

Demography and fungal diversity of the belowground ectomycorrhizal community in a chronosequence of Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] in Northumberland, Northern England, were analysed; mycorrhizal root samples were taken from 6-, 12-, 30- and 40-year-old stands, and fungal fruiting bodies were collected in autumn to complement the survey. Naturally germinated seedlings less than 1 year of age (taken from the 30-year-old stand) were also examined. A total of 118,000 mycorrhizal root tips were extracted from 40 soil cores (ten per age class) and from the complete root systems of 25 seedlings and separated into active and senescent root tips according to their morphology and anatomy. Active tips were distinguished according to their mycobionts which were characterised and identified microscopically. Although almost 100% of all fine roots were mycorrhizal, EM fungal diversity throughout the chronosequence was low, consisting of a total of 16 species of which three were only found as fruiting bodies. Of the six mycobionts found most regularly below ground, Tylospora fibrillosa was the most common, colonising about 70% of all root tips and more than 90% of those of seedlings and young trees. Root density and mycorrhizal diversity increased, but percentage of vital root tips decreased with increasing tree age, levelling off in the 30- and 40-year-old stand. Among the five subdominant fungal species, Dermocybe crocea was found to have its peak of distribution in the 12-year-old stand and Russula emetica, Lactarius rufus, Hymenoscyphus ericae agg. and the unidentified Piceirhiza sulfo-incrustata in the 30- and 40-year-old stands. The possible correlations between the mycorrhizal community structure and biotic and abiotic factors are discussed.

PMID:
15947957
DOI:
10.1007/s00572-005-0364-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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