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Sleep Med. 2005 Jul;6(4):333-9.

Erectile dysfunction, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and nasal CPAP treatment.

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1
ISTEL, Porto, Portugal.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

To evaluate the effect of one month of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in a subgroup of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and compare this subgroup with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched OSA patients without ED.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Prospective general, sleep, psychiatric and sexologic evaluations were conducted. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ), Quality of Life SF-36, and polysomnography were used. Seventeen OSA patients with ED were compared prior to CPAP treatment and during CPAP treatment with age- and BMI-matched OSA patients without ED. Parametric and non-parametric statistics, chi-square, Fisher exact test and multiple regression analyses were performed.

RESULTS:

Ninety-eight men (BMI=28.8 kg/m2, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI)=49.6 events/h, ESS=14.8, BDI=8.4, and lowest SaO2=75.3%) were divided into subgroups of lowest SaO2>80% (A) and lowest SaO2< or =80% (B). (A) Forty-six men had a mean lowest SaO2 of 85.7%+/-2.9, AHI=29.5+/-17.6, age=46.3+/-9.3 years, ESS=13.6+/-4.2, BMI=25.8+/-4.8. Seven of the patients had ED. (B) Fifty-two men had a mean lowest SaO2=60.10+/-10.0%, AHI=67.4+/-24.5, BDI=9.0+/-6.9, age=47.4+/-9.4 years, ESS=16.2+/-4.4, BMI=31.4+/-5.1. Twenty-one of the patients had ED (chi2: P=0.006). Significant variables for ED were lowest SaO2 and age (r=0.17). CPAP-treated subgroup: ED subjects had significantly lower SaO2, ESS, BDI and SF-36 subscale scores than OSA controls. Nasal CPAP eliminated the differences between groups, and ED was resolved in 13 out of 17 cases.

CONCLUSIONS:

ED in OSAS is related to nocturnal hypoxemia, and about 75% of OSAS patients with ED treated with nasal CPAP showed remission at one-month follow-up, resulting in significant improvement in quality of life.

PMID:
15946896
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleep.2005.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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