Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005 Jun;115(6):1109-17; quiz 1118.

Diet as a risk factor for atopy and asthma.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZN, Scotland, UK. Graham.Devereux@nhs.net

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that decreasing antioxidant (fruit and vegetables), increased n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA; (margarine, vegetable oil), and decreased n-3 PUFA (oily fish) intakes have contributed to the recent increases in asthma and atopic disease. Epidemiologic studies in adults and children have reported beneficial associations between dietary antioxidants and lipids and parameters of asthma and atopic disease. The associations with n-6 and n-3 PUFA appear to be very complex and might differ between asthma and atopic dermatitis. Dietary antioxidants are probably exerting antioxidant and nonantioxidant immunomodulatory effects. Dietary lipids exert numerous complex effects on proinflammatory and immunologic pathways. It has also been suggested that atopic dermatitis is associated with an enzyme defect in lipid metabolism. In spite of this, the results of interventional supplementation studies in established disease have been disappointing, and there is now increasing interest in the possibility that dietary antioxidant and lipid intakes might be important in determining expression of disease during pregnancy and early childhood and that dietary interventions should be targeted at these groups. It also seems likely that there is individual variation in the responses of individuals to lipid, and probably antioxidant, supplementation. Further research to determine whether dietary intervention can reduce the risk of asthma and atopic disease is justified.

PMID:
15940119
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2004.12.1139
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center