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Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Jul 1;41(1):52-9. Epub 2005 May 26.

Risk factors for invasive aspergillosis in solid-organ transplant recipients: a case-control study.

Author information

1
Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. jgavalda@vhebron.net

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To facilitate the design of strategies for prevention of invasive aspergillosis in solid-organ transplant recipients, this study investigates whether the development of early-onset and late-onset aspergillosis are related to different risk factors, thereby distinguishing 2 risk populations for this serious complication.

METHODS:

A retrospective case-control study was performed, including 156 cases of proven or probable invasive aspergillosis in patients recruited from 11 Spanish centers since the start of the centers' transplantation programs.

RESULTS:

Among all patients, 57% had early-onset IA (i.e., occurred during the first 3 months after transplantation). Risk factor analysis in this group identified as significantly associated risk factors a more complicated postoperative period, repeated bacterial infections or cytomegalovirus disease, and renal failure or the need for dialysis. Among patients with late-onset infections (i.e., occurred > 3 months after transplantation), who comprised 43% of cases, the patients at risk were older, were in an overimmunosuppressed state because of chronic transplant rejection or allograft dysfunction, and had posttransplantation renal failure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Risk factors in patients with early-onset cases and patients with late-onset cases of posttransplantation invasive aspergillosis are not the same, a fact that could have implications for the preventive approaches used for this infection.

PMID:
15937763
DOI:
10.1086/430602
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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