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Can J Microbiol. 2005 Mar;51(3):197-208.

Proteomic and microscopic analysis of biofilms formed by Listeria monocytogenes 568.

Author information

1
Centre for Biologics Research, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON.

Abstract

Biofilm formation may be important in the colonization of the food-processing environment by the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes 568 formed adherent multicellular layers on a variety of test surfaces following growth at 37 degrees C with multiple transfers of the test surface into fresh medium. Microscopic examination of these adherent layers suggest that the cells were surrounded by extracellular material. The presence of a carbohydrate containing extracellular polymeric matrix was confirmed by labelling hydrated adherent layers with fluorescein-conjugated concanavalin A, indicating that these adherent layers are biofilms. To gain insight into the physiological state of cells in these biofilms, the proteomes from biofilm- and planktonic-grown cells from the same cultures were compared using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Nineteen proteins, which exhibited higher levels of expression in biofilm-grown cells, were successfully identified from the 2-D gels using a combination of MALDI-TOF and MS/MS. Proteins that were found to be more highly expressed in biofilm-grown cells were involved in stress response, envelope and protein synthesis, biosynthesis, energy generation, and regulatory functions. In biofilm-grown cells, many proteins in the pH range 4-6 ran as multiple spots arranged horizontally across the 2-D gels.

PMID:
15920617
DOI:
10.1139/w04-129
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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