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Transplant Proc. 2005 May;37(4):1792-4.

Steroid sparing in renal transplantation with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil: three-year results.

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1
Renal Unit, St. Mary's Hospital, Paddington, London, United Kingdom. richardborrows@doctors.org.uk

Abstract

Although renal transplantation with a 7-day steroid-sparing regimen, tacrolimus and mycophenolate, is associated with good short-term outcomes, late allograft dysfunction and failure remain concerns. In this study 101 consecutive patients underwent renal transplantation using this immunosuppressive regimen. In addition, anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody was used in 25 high-risk patients (regrafts, two-antigen human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR mismatch or sensitized with anti-HLA panel reactivity >30%). After a median follow-up of 39 months (range 29 to 49), overall patient survival is 98%, with two cardiac deaths. Three other graft losses occurred, one each to early venous thrombosis, polyoma viral nephropathy, and late rejection due to noncompliance. Therefore, overall graft survival is 95%. The acute rejection rate at 6 and 12 months was 19% (no rejection occurred between months 6 and 12). Late rejection was uncommon, with only two further episodes beyond 12 months. Mean creatinine at 12 months was 144 micromol/L and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 55 mL/min. Graft function was stable at 3 years with a mean creatinine of 142 micromol/L and mean estimated GFR 56 mL/min. During the study, five patients developed posttransplant diabetes mellitus (two cases beyond 12 months). Tissue-invasive cytomegalovirus disease and BK viral nephropathy each occurred in three patients, with all episodes in the first 12 months. Mean weight gain is 3.3 kg and mean blood pressure is 135/81 on an average of 1.5 antihypertensive agents. This steroid-avoidance regimen is associated with excellent medium-term patient and graft outcomes and a low incidence of side effects.

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