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Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jul;29(7):798-803.

History of weight and obesity through life and risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

Author information

1
Unita di Epidemiologia e Biostatistica, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (PN), Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The relation of anthropometric measures, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) risk was investigated.

DESIGN:

Hospital-based case-control study.

SUBJECTS:

Cases were 1369 men with histologically confirmed BPH, and controls were 1451 men below 75 y, admitted to hospital for acute non-neoplastic diseases.

MEASUREMENTS:

Using a structured questionnaire, trained interviewers collected information on self-reported height and weight, and measured waist and hip circumference of patients. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional multiple logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

Compared to the corresponding lowest quartile, the OR for the highest one were 0.76 (95% CI 0.59-0.98) for body weight, 0.71 (95% CI 0.54-0.94) for waist-to-hip ratio and 0.87 (95% CI 0.70-1.09) for body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)). Compared to a lowest lifelong BMI <20.7 kg/m(2), the OR was 1.56 (95% CI 1.25-1.95) for a lowest lifelong BMI > or =23.7 kg/m(2). The OR was 0.74 (95% CI 0.60-0.93) for a lifelong increase of BMI > or =6.1 kg/m(2), compared to <1.6 kg/m(2). No association emerged for history of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overweight was modestly, inversely related to BPH. The hypothesis of reduced testosterone levels in obese individuals may explain the different BPH risk and need to be tested.

PMID:
15917855
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ijo.0802979
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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