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Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jul;29(7):826-32.

Body composition and fat repartition in relation to structure and function of large arteries in middle-aged adults (the SU.VI.MAX study).

Author information

1
French Institute of Health and Medical Research, Unit 557, Paris, France. sebastien.czernichow@htd.aphp.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate associations of body composition assessed by bioimpedance analysis and anthropometric indicators of fat repartition with carotid structure and function.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional epidemiological study.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 1014 middle-aged apparently healthy adults participating in the SU.VI.MAX study.

MEASUREMENTS:

Body composition (fat mass, fat-free mass) was assessed by bioimpedance analysis and anthropometric indicators of fat repartition (waist circumference (WC); waist-hip-ratio (WHR)) were simultaneously collected. Carotid ultrasound examination included measurements of intima-media thickness (IMT) at the common carotid arteries (CCA) and assessment of atherosclerotic plaques in extracranial carotid arteries. Carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was used as a marker of aortic stiffness.

RESULTS:

In multivariate analyses adjusted for major known cardiovascular risk factors in addition to age, gender and height, fat-free mass, fat mass (FM), and WC were positively associated with CCA-IMT and lumen diameter. No significant association was found with occurrence of carotid plaques. PWV was only associated with WC. Associations of CCA-IMT and PWV with WC were not significant anymore after further adjustment on body mass index (BMI) or FM.

CONCLUSION:

WC was the only measurement positively associated with both early atherosclerosis markers such as CCA-IMT and arterial stiffness. Although this association depends on overall adiposity, as assessed by the BMI, it emphasizes the importance of WC in clinical practice and prevention programs as a screening tool for individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
15917850
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ijo.0802986
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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