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Prev Med. 2005 Aug;41(2):651-6.

CRP levels are elevated in smokers but unrelated to the number of cigarettes and are decreased by long-term smoking cessation in male smokers.

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1
Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505, Japan. masakio@iwate-med.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is not clear whether there is a dose-response relationship between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and CRP level and whether there is a relationship between the length of smoking cessation and CRP level.

METHODS:

Geometric mean levels of CRP were compared in smoking status groups for 1926 men aged 40 to 69 years using analysis of covariance.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for several confounding factors, geometric mean levels of CRP (mg/L) were significantly different among the three smoking status groups (0.41 in non-smokers, 0.57 in current smokers, 0.48 in past smokers, P < 0.05). A linear trend was not found in the relationship between CRP level and number of cigarettes smoked per day. The mean CRP level in the long cessation (> or =5 years) group was significantly lower than that in the short cessation (<5 years) group (0.45 vs. 0.58, P < 0.05) and similar to that in the non-smokers group (0.45 vs. 0.41, NS).

CONCLUSIONS:

CRP levels in current smokers are elevated but unrelated to the number of cigarettes smoked per day. In past smokers, long-term smoking cessation may contribute to the reduction in risk of development of cardiovascular diseases through inflammatory mechanisms.

PMID:
15917065
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2005.02.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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