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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2005 Jul;69(7):903-9. Epub 2005 Mar 16.

Pediatric vocal nodules: correlation with perceptual voice analysis.

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1
Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Disorders, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To present the epidemiology and correlation with perceptual analysis of vocal nodules in pediatric patients.

METHODS:

Retrospective review of patients seen in a tertiary care pediatric hospital's voice center from 1996 to 2003. Six hundred and forty-six patients were evaluated with videostroboscopic examinations and perceptual analysis of voice characteristics by speech pathologists. Appropriate treatment was based on the pathology identified.

RESULTS:

Two hundred and fifty-four patients (40%) with an average age of 7.7 years (range 0.1-19.3 years) were identified as having vocal nodules. Of these, 72% were male. Six patients (2%) were under the age of 7 months. Nodules were most commonly found in males, aged 3-10 years old. Evidence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease was found in one-quarter of patients; hyperfunction of the larynx was seen in three-fourths. Hyperfunction of the larynx correlates with the size of vocal nodules. Distortion of the vocal fold mucosal wave was not present. Perceptual analysis revealed positive correlation of the severity of hoarseness, breathiness, straining and aphonia with the size of vocal nodules.

CONCLUSION:

The epidemiology and correlation with perceptual voice analysis in pediatric patients with vocal nodules is presented. Hyperfunction of the larynx correlates with nodule size, while the presence of reflux disease does not. The severity of hoarseness, breathiness, straining and aphonia correlates with the size of vocal nodules.

PMID:
15911007
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2005.01.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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