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Am J Manag Care. 2005 May;11(5):298-304.

Point-of-Service reminders for prescribing cardiovascular medications.

Author information

1
Southern California Kaiser Permanente Department of Research and Evaluation, 393 E Walnut Street, Pasadena, CA 91188, USA. stephen.f.derose@kp.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To provide physicians with evidence-based recommendations for care at the point of service, using an automated system, and to evaluate its effectiveness in promoting prescriptions to prevent cardiovascular events.

STUDY DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial.

METHODS:

Patients at risk for cardiovascular events who might benefit from angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) were identified from electronic data in a managed care organization and randomly assigned into 2 groups. Physicians seeing outpatients in the intervention group were faxed a sheet with pertinent patient data, including a recommendation to prescribe the indicated medication. In the control group, the data sheet did not include the recommendation. Dispensed prescriptions were compared between groups.

RESULTS:

More than 4000 visits were observed for each medication type. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers were dispensed in 7.1% of visits in the intervention group versus 5.7% in the control group (P = .048) following the first patient-physician encounter. No significant difference was observed for statins (intervention, 8.1% vs control, 7.7%). Data for all patient-physician encounters and both medications were combined in logistic regression analysis. The odds ratio was 1.19 for a dispensed prescription in the intervention group and 1.54 for 2 or more visits versus 1 visit.

CONCLUSIONS:

An automated system that provides pertinent data and tailored recommendations for care at the point of service modestly increased prescription dispensing rates. Targeting patient-provider encounters to change provider behavior is challenging; however, even small effects can produce clinically important results over time.

PMID:
15898218
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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