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Arch Dermatol. 2005 May;141(5):579-86.

The prevalence of common acquired melanocytic nevi and the relationship with skin type characteristics and sun exposure among children in Lithuania.

Author information

  • 1Clinic of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Kaunas University of Medicine, Kaunas, Lithuania. svaliuke@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the prevalence of common acquired melanocytic nevi and its relationship with pigmentary characteristics and severe sunburns in children.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

Kaunas city, Lithuania (latitude of 55 degrees 55 minutes).

PATIENTS:

A random sample of 484 children aged 1 to 2 years, 4 to 5 years, and 9 to 10 years and adolescents aged 14 to 15 years.

INTERVENTIONS:

A questionnaire that provided information about the history of sunbathing and skin type.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Atypical melanocytic nevi were defined according to the clinical criteria of the ABCDE rule.

RESULTS:

The median number of all common acquired melanocytic nevi was 12 in boys and 11 in girls; the median number of melanocytic nevi 2 mm or larger in boys and girls was 4. Twenty-seven percent of children experienced severe sunburns more than once. After adjustment for age and sex, it was found that children who had severe sunburns in summer and skin type I had a higher density of all melanocytic nevi and melanocytic nevi 2 mm or larger. The prevalence of atypical melanocytic nevi was 7% in all children and was age dependent (age 4-5 years, 1%; 9-10 years, 4%; 14-15 years, 16%). Three percent of children had congenital melanocytic nevi.

CONCLUSIONS:

The total number of common acquired melanocytic nevi in children increased with age. There was a positive association between severe sunburns, the tendency of the skin to burn, and the number of all melanocytic nevi and nevi 2 mm or larger.

PMID:
15897379
DOI:
10.1001/archderm.141.5.579
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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