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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 May;86(5):993-8.

Validation of a new lower-extremity motor coordination test.

Author information

1
Research Center on Aging, Sherbrooke Geriatric University Institute, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the test-retest reliability and construct validity of a new lower-extremity motor coordination test, the Lower Extremity MOtor COordination Test (LEMOCOT).

DESIGN:

To test reliability, subjects with impairments in at least 1 lower extremity were evaluated twice by the same evaluator. To test construct validity, the LEMOCOT scores obtained from subjects who had had a stroke were correlated with physical, functional, cognitive, and perceptual tests.

SETTING:

Geriatric day hospital and functional intensive rehabilitation unit.

PARTICIPANTS:

In the reliability test, 29 people (mean age, 69.6y; range, 28-87y); in the construct validity, 144 people who recently had had a stroke.

INTERVENTION:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

In addition to the LEMOCOT, the following measures were used for construct validity: the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (motor function), Berg Balance Scale, 5-m walking test, 2-minute walking test, Functional Autonomy Measurement System, Modified Mini-Mental State Examination, and Motor-Free Visual Perceptual Test.

RESULTS:

Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) indicated that test-retest reliability is good (right-side ICC=.88; left-side ICC=.83). The construct validity of the LEMOCOT was demonstrated by obtaining high correlations with physical and functional tests ( r range, .62-.79; P <.001) and no correlations with cognitive ( r =.11, P =.20) or visual perceptual tests ( r =.15, P =.08) and by discriminating between subjects discharged to long-term care versus other living environments ( P <.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The LEMOCOT is a simple lower-extremity motor coordination test that showed good test-retest reliability and construct validity. It can be used in clinical and research settings, specifically with people who have had a stroke. Other studies should be carried out to confirm its psychometric properties.

PMID:
15895347
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2004.11.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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