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Heart. 2005 Jun;91(6):774-8.

N-acetylcysteine does not prevent contrast induced nephropathy after cardiac catheterisation with an ionic low osmolality contrast medium: a multicentre clinical trial.

Author information

1
Division of Interventional Cardiology, Hospital São Lucas, Pontifícia Universidade Católica-RS, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate oral N-acetylcysteine in the prevention of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients at low to moderate risk undergoing cardiac catheterisation with ionic low osmolality contrast medium.

METHODS:

In a multicentre double blind clinical trial 156 patients undergoing coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention with serum creatinine > or = 106.08 micromol/l or creatinine clearance < 50 ml/min or diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to receive N-acetylcysteine 600 mg orally twice daily for two days or placebo. Only low osmolality ionic contrast medium was used.

RESULTS:

Sixteen patients developed CIN, defined as an increase of 44.2 micromol/l in creatinine in 48 hours: eight of 77 patients (10.4%) in the N-acetylcysteine group and eight of 79 patients (10.1%) in the placebo group (p = 1.00). The mean (SD) change in serum creatinine was similar in both groups: 7.96 (35.36) micromol/l in the N-acetylcysteine group and 6.19 (25.64) micromol/l in the placebo group (p = 0.67). No difference was observed in the change in endogenous creatinine clearance (-0.54 (10.4) ml/min v -2.52 (12.3) ml/min, N-acetylcysteine and placebo, respectively, p = 0.28).

CONCLUSION:

Oral N-acetylcysteine did not prevent CIN in patients at low to moderate risk undergoing cardiac catheterisation with ionic low osmolality contrast medium.

PMID:
15894775
PMCID:
PMC1768952
DOI:
10.1136/hrt.2004.039636
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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