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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2005 Dec;70(3):263-9.

Prevalence and control of dyslipidemia among persons with diabetes in the United States.

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  • 1Heart Disease Prevention Program, C240 Medical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We assessed the prevalence, treatment, and control of dyslipidemia among United States (U.S.) adults with diabetes.

METHODS:

Among 498 adults (projected to 13.4 million) aged >or=18 years with diabetes representative of the U.S. population and surveyed within the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2000, control of lipids was classified according to American Diabetes Association criteria. The extent of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglyceride (TG) control was examined by gender and ethnicity, in comparison to those without diabetes, and according to lipid-lowering treatment. Analyses were weighted to the U.S. population.

RESULTS:

Less than one-third of men and only one-fifth of women with diabetes are in control for LDL-C, defined as <2.6 mmol/l (<100mg/dl); over 70% are not at goal. Over half of men and over two-thirds of women have low levels of HDL-C (<or=1.0 mmol/l [<40 mg/dl] in men or <or=1.3 mmol/l [<or=50mg/dl] in women) and over half have elevated levels of triglycerides (>or=1.7 mmol/l [150 mg/dl]). Low HDL-C was more common in Caucasians (70.1%) than in Hispanics (58.8%) or African-Americans (41.5%) (p<0.001). 28.2% of subjects with diabetes were on lipid-lowering treatment. Control of LDL-C did not differ by treatment status and only 3% of subjects were controlled to target levels for all lipids.

CONCLUSION:

Many persons with diabetes remain uncontrolled for dyslipidemia. Intensified efforts at screening and treatment according to current guidelines are warranted.

PMID:
15890427
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2005.03.032
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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