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J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 May;105(5):807-9.

Calcium fortification systems differ in bioavailability.

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1
Creighton University Medical Center, 601 N. 30th Street, Omaha, NE 68131, USA. rheaney@creighton.edu

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare the bioavailability of calcium from two fortification systems used in orange juice. The design was randomized crossover, within-subject. The subjects were 25 healthy premenopausal women in an academic health sciences center. Two commercially marketed calcium-fortified orange juices, ingested in an amount providing 500 mg calcium, were taken at breakfast after an overnight fast. The two fortification systems tested were calcium citrate malate and a combination of tricalcium phosphate and calcium lactate (tricalcium phosphate/calcium lactate). The main outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC) for the increase in serum calcium from 0 to 9 hours after ingesting the test calcium source. Statistical analyses performed were repeated measures analysis of variance, testing source, and sequence. AUC 9 was 48% greater for calcium citrate malate than for tricalcium phosphate/calcium lactate ( P < .001); absorbed calcium calculated from AUC 9 values (mean+/-standard error of the mean) was 148+/-9.0 mg and 100+/-8.9 mg for calcium citrate malate and tricalcium phosphate/calcium lactate, respectively. The results indicate that equivalent calcium contents on a nutritional label do not guarantee equivalent nutritional value. Nutritionists and dietetics professionals should encourage manufacturers of fortified products to provide information on bioavailability.

PMID:
15883561
DOI:
10.1016/j.jada.2005.02.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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