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J Hum Nutr Diet. 2005 Jun;18(3):213-9.

Comparison of energy and protein intakes of older people consuming a texture modified diet with a normal hospital diet.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London, UK. lwright@hhnt.nhs.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are very few studies looking at the energy and protein requirements of patients requiring texture modified diets. Dysphagia is the main indication for people to be recommended texture-modified diets. Older people post-stroke are the key group in the hospital setting who consume this type of diet. The diets can be of several consistencies ranging from pureed to soft textures.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the 24-hour dietary intake of older people consuming a texture modified diet in a clinical setting to older people consuming a normal hospital diet.

METHOD:

Weighed food intakes and food record charts were used to quantify the patients' intakes, which were compared to their individual requirements.

RESULTS:

The oral intake of 55 patients was measured. Twenty-five of the patients surveyed were eating a normal diet and acted as controls for 30 patients who were prescribed a texture-modified diet. The results showed that the texture-modified group had significantly lower intakes of energy (3877 versus 6115 kJ, P < 0.0001) and protein (40 versus 60 g, P < 0.003) compared to consumption of the normal diet. The energy and protein deficit from estimated requirements was significantly greater in the texture-modified group (2549 versus 357 kJ, P < 0.0001; 6 versus 22 g, P = 0.013; respectively).

CONCLUSION:

These statistically significant results indicate that older people on texture-modified diets have a lower intake of energy and protein than those consuming a normal hospital diet and it is likely that other nutrients will be inadequate. All patients on texture-modified diets should be assessed by the dietitian for nutritional support. Evidence based strategies for improving overall nutrient intake should be identified.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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