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Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2005 May;28(3):197-212.

GIS-facilitated spatial epidemiology of tick-borne diseases in coyotes (Canis latrans) in northern and coastal California.

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1
Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. jefoley@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

Ixodes pacificus is the main tick vector for transmission of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Borrelia burgdorferi to large vertebrates in California. The present study was undertaken in I. pacificus-infested counties in California to examine spatial and temporal relationships among A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi-exposed coyotes with vegetation type and climate. The overall A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi seroprevalences were 39.5% (N=215) and 18.9% (N=148), respectively, with no association with sex. PCR for A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi was negative in all blood and kidney samples. Increased seroprevalence was a positive function of rainfall. Ehrlichial seropositivity was increased in blue-oak foothill pine, montane hardwood, and redwood vegetation regions, and decreased in coastal sagebrush and cropland. Increased exposure to B. burgdorferi occurred in blue oak woodland.

PMID:
15857659
DOI:
10.1016/j.cimid.2005.01.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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