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Surgery. 2005 May;137(5):499-505.

Early and late complications after pancreatic necrosectomy.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Royal Liverpool University Hospital.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Surgery for pancreatic necrosis is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to review the incidence of early and late complications after pancreatic necrosectomy in a large contemporary series of patients.

METHODS:

The clinical outcomes of 88 patients who underwent pancreatic necrosectomy between 1997 and 2003 were reviewed.

RESULTS:

The median age was 55.5 (range, 18-85) years, 54 (61%) were males, 68 (77%) had primary pancreatic infection, 71 (81%) had >50% necrosis, and the median admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score was 9 (range, 1-21). Median time to surgery was 31 (range, 1-161) days; 47 patients underwent minimally invasive necrosectomy and 41 open necrosectomy; 81 (92%) of patients had complications postoperatively, and 25 (28%) died. Multiorgan failure (odds ratio = 3.4, P = .05) and hemorrhage (odds ratio = 6.1, P = .03) were the only independent predictors of mortality. During a median follow-up of 28.9 months, 39 (62%) of 63 surviving patients had one or more late complications: biliary stricture in 4 (6%), pseudocyst in 5 (8%), pancreatic fistula in 8 (13%), gastrointestinal fistula in 1 (2%), delayed collections in 3 (5%), and incisional hernia in 1 (2%); intervention was required in 10 (16%) patients. Sixteen (25%) of 63 surviving patients developed exocrine insufficiency, and 19 (33%) of 58 without prior diabetes mellitus developed endocrine insufficiency.

CONCLUSIONS:

Almost all patients undergoing necrosectomy developed significant early or late complications or both. Multiorgan failure and postoperative hemorrhage were independent predictors of mortality. Long-term follow-up was important because 62% developed complications, and 16% of those with complications required surgical or endoscopic intervention.

PMID:
15855920
DOI:
10.1016/j.surg.2005.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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