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Curr Biol. 2005 Apr 26;15(8):771-7.

The CENP-F-like proteins HCP-1 and HCP-2 target CLASP to kinetochores to mediate chromosome segregation.

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1
Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, 92093, USA. icheeseman@ucsd.edu

Abstract

During chromosome segregation, kinetochores form dynamic connections with spindle microtubules. In vertebrates, these attachments require the activities of a number of outer kinetochore proteins, including CENP-F [1, 2] and the widely conserved microtubule-associated protein CLASP [3]. Here, we investigate the functional relationship between HCP-1/2, two redundant CENP-F-like proteins, and CLASP(CLS-2) in Caenorhabditis elegans. HCP-1/2 and CLASP(CLS-2) localize transiently to mitotic C. elegans kinetochores with nearly identical kinetic profiles, and biochemical purifications demonstrate that they also associate physically. In embryos depleted of HCP-1/2, CLASP(CLS-2) no longer localizes to chromosomes, whereas CLASP(CLS-2) depletion does not prevent HCP-1/2 targeting. Consistent with the localization dependency and biochemical association, depletion of HCP-1/2 or CLASP(CLS-2) resulted in virtually identical defects in mitotic chromosome segregation characterized by a failure of sister-chromatid biorientation. This phenotype could be partially suppressed by disrupting the astral forces that pull spindle poles apart in the 1 cell embryo, indicating that CLASP(CLS-2) is required for biorientation when chromosome-spindle attachments are subjected to poleward force. Our results establish that the key role of HCP-1/2 is to target CLASP(CLS-2) to kinetochores, and they support the recently proposed model that CLASP functions to promote the polymerization of kinetochore bound microtubules [4].

PMID:
15854912
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2005.03.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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