Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Aug;29(8):909-15.

Psychosocial working conditions and weight gain among employees.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. tea.lallukka@helsinki.fi

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the associations between psychosocial working conditions and weight gain.

DESIGN, SUBJECTS AND MEASUREMENTS:

Data from postal questionnaires (response rate 67%) sent to 40- to 60-y-old women (n=7093) and men (n=1799) employed by the City of Helsinki in 2000-2002 were analysed. Weight gain during the previous 12 months was the outcome variable in logistic regression analyses. Independent variables included Karasek's job demands and job control, work fatigue, working overtime, work-related mental strain, social support and the work-home interface. The final models were adjusted for age, education, marital status, physical strain and body mass index.

RESULTS:

In the previous 12 months, 25% of women and 19% of men reported weight gain. Work fatigue and working overtime were associated with weight gain in both sexes. Women who were dissatisfied with combining paid work and family life were more likely to have gained weight. Men with low job demands were less likely to have gained weight. All of these associations were independent of each other.

CONCLUSIONS:

Few work-related factors were associated with weight gain. However, our study suggests that work fatigue and working overtime are potential risk factors for weight gain. These findings need to be confirmed in prospective studies.

PMID:
15852046
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ijo.0802962
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Support Center