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Arch Med Res. 2005 Mar-Apr;36(2):159-65.

Comparison of fluoxetine and paroxetine in type II diabetes mellitus patients.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, Atatürk Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study aims to investigate the efficacy of fluoxetine and paroxetine on the levels of depression-anxiety, quality of life, disability, and metabolic control in type II diabetes mellitus (DM) patients.

METHODS:

The patients were first applied the Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale (HADS). After a psychiatric interview with patients who had scores above the cut-off point, those who were diagnosed as having a major depressive disorder according to DSM-IV criteria were applied the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS). Twenty three patients who scored 16 or above on the HDRS were included in the study and given the Short Form-36 (SF-36), and the Brief Disability Questionnaire (BDQ) and HbA1c levels were measured. Patients were randomized on 20 mg/day fluoxetine or 20 mg/day paroxetine treatment. The patients were evaluated with the same scales at the 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th), and the 12(th) weeks.

RESULTS:

Both groups showed a statistically significant decrease in HDRS, HARS, and BDQ scores with comparison to the index assessment. At the end of treatment, though not statistically significant, a decrease was observed in HbA1c values of the fluoxetine-administered group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fluoxetine and paroxetine effectively reduce the severity of major depressive disorder in type II DM patients. There is need for further and longer-lasting monitoring studies with more patients in order to determine whether there is any difference in terms of their effects on glycemic control.

PMID:
15847950
DOI:
10.1016/j.arcmed.2004.12.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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