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Cancer Biol Ther. 2005 May;4(5):538-45. Epub 2005 May 28.

PWT-458, a novel pegylated-17-hydroxywortmannin, inhibits phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling and suppresses growth of solid tumors.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology Research, Wyeth Research, Pearl River, NY, USA. yuk@wyeth.com

Abstract

Deregulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway is widely implicated in tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy. While a strong rationale exists for pharmacological targeting of PI3K, only a few proof-of-principle in vivo efficacy studies are currently available. PWT-458, pegylated-17-hydroxywortmannin, is a novel and highly potent inhibitor of PI3K in animal models. Upon in vivo cleavage of its poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG), PWT-458 releases its active moiety 17-hydroxywortmannin (17-HWT), the most potent inhibitor in its class. Here we show that a single intravenous injection of PWT-458 rapidly inhibited PI3K signaling, as measured by a complete loss of AKT (Ser-473) phosphorylation in xenograft tumors grown in nude mice. Following a daily X5 dosing regimen, PWT-458 demonstrated single-agent antitumor activity in nude mouse xenograft models of U87MG glioma, nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) A498. Efficacious doses ranged from 0.5 mg/kg to 10 mg/kg, achieving a superior therapeutic index over 17-HWT. PWT-458 augmented anticancer efficacy of a suboptimal dose of paclitaxel against A549 and U87MG tumors. Combination treatment of PWT-458 and an mTOR inhibitor, Pegylated-Rapamycin (Peg-Rapa), resulted in an enhanced antitumor efficacy in U87MG. Finally, PWT-458 in combination with interferon-alpha (Intron-A) caused a dramatic regression of RCC A498, which was not achieved by either agent alone. These studies identify PWT-458 as an effective anticancer agent and provide strong proof-of-principle for targeting the PI3K pathway as novel anticancer therapy.

Comment in

PMID:
15846106
DOI:
10.4161/cbt.4.5.1660
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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