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Behav Neurosci. 2005 Apr;119(2):464-72.

Locomotor activity predicts acquisition of self-administration behavior but not cocaine intake.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. juniper@itsa.ucsf.edu

Abstract

The current study investigates locomotor activity in a novel environment and correlates these activity levels with cocaine self-administration in rats that were either trained or untrained on a lever-pressing task prior to cocaine self-administration. The authors report that it is the rate of learning the lever-pressing task, not cocaine self-administration, that correlates with locomotor activity. The results suggest that a correlation between locomotor activity and cocaine self-administration is secondary to a link between locomotor activity and rate of learning to lever press for a reward. The authors conclude that locomotor activity is not necessarily an indicator of propensity to self-administer cocaine and demonstrate that environmental novelty and rate of learning an operant task are important considerations when designing experiments on drug-seeking behaviors.

PMID:
15839792
PMCID:
PMC4327862
DOI:
10.1037/0735-7044.119.2.464
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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