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AIDS. 2005 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S99-109.

Effects of a peer-led behavioral intervention to reduce HIV transmission and promote serostatus disclosure among HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men.

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1
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road (E-37), Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. rwolitski@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the effects of an enhanced peer-led intervention on transmission risk behavior and serostatus disclosure of HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men.

DESIGN:

A randomized intervention trial.

METHODS:

HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men were recruited from New York City and San Francisco and were randomly assigned to either a standard or an enhanced intervention. The standard intervention consisted of one session that provided safer sex information. The enhanced intervention consisted of six sessions and included safer sex information, interactive learning activities, and discussion groups that were facilitated by HIV-seropositive peers. Participants completed audio computer-assisted self interview (A-CASI) assessments at baseline and 3 and 6-month follow-ups. Optional testing for sexually transmitted infections was offered at baseline and the 6-month follow-up.

RESULTS:

A total of 811 participants met the inclusion criteria for outcome analyses. Of these, 85 and 90% were retained for the 3 and 6-month follow-ups, respectively. Compared with the standard intervention, fewer men assigned to the enhanced intervention reported unprotected receptive anal intercourse with a negative or unknown-serostatus partner at 3 months (21 versus 26%, P < 0.05). However, there were no other significant differences in transmission risk or serostatus disclosure at 3 or 6 months.

CONCLUSION:

The enhanced intervention was associated with only a limited reduction in transmission risk at 3 months relative to the standard intervention. The characteristics of the intervention that may have reduced its efficacy are identified and directions for future research are suggested.

PMID:
15838199
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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