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Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005 Apr;131(4):308-14.

Quality of life and sleep study findings after adenotonsillectomy in children with obstructive sleep apnea.

Author information

1
The Bobby R. Alford Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. mgstew@bcm

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess polysomnogram (PSG) results and global and disease-specific quality of life (QOL) in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), before and after adenotonsillectomy, and to assess the association between PSG findings and QOL.

DESIGN:

Prospective observational study. We performed overnight PSG using standardized techniques and assessed disease-specific and global QOL using validated instruments. Follow-up was assessed at 1 year. We compared QOL outcomes between children who underwent adenotonsillectomy and children who did not.

SETTING:

A large tertiary care children's hospital.

PATIENTS:

Children with sleep-disordered breathing who were suspected of having OSA.

INTERVENTION:

Adenotonsillectomy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

We evaluated PSG parameters, disease-specific QOL, and global QOL.

RESULTS:

We enrolled 47 children, 31 of whom met PSG criteria for OSA. Disease-specific and global QOL were not significantly different between children with OSA and children without. Global QOL was significantly worse for children with OSA than healthy children on several subscales: general health perception, behavior, and parental impact-emotional. Children who underwent adenotonsillectomy had significant improvements in QOL scores and PSG parameters (apnea-hypopnea index, P = .004; minimum saturation, P = .004). We found significantly larger QOL changes in children who underwent surgery compared with children without surgery (subscales: infections, P = .01; airway, P = .002; swallowing, P = .02; and behavior, P = .03). No strong association was identified between QOL scores and PSG parameters.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with OSA and sleep-disordered breathing have significantly worse QOL than healthy children. However, the association between PSG findings and QOL was only moderate. Children with OSA treated with adenotonsillectomy demonstrated large improvements in disease-specific and global QOL as well as PSG parameters.

PMID:
15837898
DOI:
10.1001/archotol.131.4.308
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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