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Diabetologia. 2005 May;48(5):931-7. Epub 2005 Apr 14.

Small intestinal enteropathy in non-obese diabetic mice fed a diet containing wheat.

Author information

1
Institute of Food Science, CNR, via Roma 52 A/C, 83100 Avellino, Italy. maurano@isa.cnr.it

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

A deranged mucosal immune response and dietary factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. The aims of our work were to look for the presence of small intestinal enteropathy in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice in relation to the presence of wheat proteins in the diet, and to assess their role in the risk of developing diabetes.

METHODS:

Female NOD mice were fed a standard or gluten-free diet or a gluten-free diet with the addition of wheat proteins (MGFD). Small intestine architecture, intraepithelial CD3(+) infiltration, epithelial expression of H2-IA, mRNA for IFN-gamma and IL-4 were assessed.

RESULTS:

NOD mice fed a standard diet showed reduced villous height, increased intraepithelial infiltration by CD3(+) cells and enhanced expression of H2-IA and IFN-gamma mRNA when compared with mice on the gluten-free diet. The cumulative diabetes incidence at 43 weeks of age was 65% in the latter and 97% in the former (p<0.01). Mice on MGFD also showed increased epithelial infiltration and a higher incidence of diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

Mice fed a wheat-containing diet showed a higher incidence of diabetes, signs of small intestinal enteropathy and higher mucosal levels of proinflammatory cytokines.

PMID:
15830185
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-005-1718-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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