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Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Apr;11(4):554-61.

Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, Australia.

Author information

1
The Canberra Hospital, Garran, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. peter.collignon@act.gov.au

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is common and increasing worldwide. A retrospective review was undertaken to quantify the number of cases, their place of acquisition, and the proportions caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in 17 hospitals in Australia. Of 3,192 episodes, 1,571 (49%) were community onset. MRSA caused 40% of hospital-onset episodes and 12% of community-onset episodes. The median rate of SAB was 1.48/1,000 admissions (range 0.61-3.24; median rate for hospital-onset SAB was 0.7/1,000 and for community onset 0.8/1,000 admissions). Using these rates, we estimate that approximately 6,900 episodes of SAB occur annually in Australia (35/100,000 population). SAB is common, and a substantial proportion of cases may be preventable. The epidemiology is evolving, with >10% of community-onset SAB now caused by MRSA. This is an emerging infectious disease concern and is likely to impact on empiric antimicrobial drug prescribing in suspected cases of SAB.

Comment in

PMID:
15829193
PMCID:
PMC3320328
DOI:
10.3201/eid1104.040772
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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