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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Jul;90(7):3824-9. Epub 2005 Apr 12.

Effects of calcium supplementation on body weight and blood pressure in normal older women: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1020, New Zealand. i.reid@auckland.ac.nz

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Epidemiological data suggest that high calcium intakes are associated with decreased body weight and blood pressure. However, there is little evidence from randomized trials that addresses these important issues.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effects of calcium on body weight and blood pressure.

DESIGN:

This is a substudy of an ongoing, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of calcium supplementation. End points were assessed at 30 months.

SETTING:

This study was performed at a university medical center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Normal postmenopausal women (mean age, 74 yr; mean weight, 67 kg; mean blood pressure, 134/70 mm Hg at baseline) participated in this study.

INTERVENTION:

Study subjects were treated with calcium (1 g/d; n = 732) and placebo (n = 739).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Body weight and blood pressure were the main outcome measures.

RESULTS:

Weight decreased by 368 +/- 132 g (mean +/- se) with calcium treatment and by 369 +/- 134 g with placebo (P = 0.93). Fat and lean masses did not show an effect of calcium. Blood pressure showed transient reductions of 1-2 mm Hg at 6 months in the calcium group, resulting in a significant between-group difference only for systolic pressure (P = 0.048). At 30 months, the change from baseline in systolic pressure was 0.0 +/- 0.9 mm Hg in the calcium group and 2.4 +/- 0.9 mm Hg in the placebo group (P = 0.14). For diastolic pressures, the changes were -0.2 +/- 0.4 and 0.8 +/- 0.4 mm Hg, respectively (P = 0.13). In those with baseline calcium intakes less than 600 mg/d, the treatment effect was greater and did persist.

CONCLUSIONS:

Calcium supplementation of 1 g/d does not produce biologically significant effects on body weight, and its hypotensive effect is small and transient in most women.

Comment in

PMID:
15827103
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2004-2205
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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