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J Occup Environ Med. 2005 Apr;47(4):424-7.

Depression and occupational injury: results of a pilot investigation.

Author information

1
Department of Health Policy and Management, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. peele@pitt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Even mild clinical depression can cause decreased vigilance, attention span, increased irritability, and insomnia-all well-known precursors to occupational injury. This pilot project explores the relationship between occupational injury and depression.

METHOD:

One hundred twenty-one individuals with recent work-related injuries and 140 without work-related injuries completed a self-administered depression screening instrument (PHQ-9). We compared the two groups using bivariate analyses. The impact of depression on injury was examined using logistic regression analysis controlling for employment history, marital status, age, and sex.

RESULTS:

Overall, injured workers in this study were not more likely to be depressed than a comparison group of uninjured workers. However, injured women had significantly higher depression scores than non-injured women (P = 0.04); no such difference was found for men.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest that depression may serve as a precursor to occupational injury for women.

PMID:
15824634
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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