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J Endocrinol Invest. 2005 Jan;28(1):18-22.

Experience in management of 51 non-functioning pituitary adenomas: indications for post-operative radiotherapy.

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1
Department of Endocrinology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECT:

The indications for additional radiotherapy (RT) after surgery for non-functioning pituitary adenoma are controversial. The goal of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of surgically treated patients, with or without post- operative irradiation.

METHODS:

Review of cases treated for non-functioning pituitary adenoma. Fifty-one patients were identified, with a mean post-operative follow-up of 6.4+/-3.5 yr. Twenty-nine patients showed residual tumor after surgery and 22 did not. Serial endocrine, visual and radiological evaluations were made after treatment to assess the efficacy and toxicity of surgery and RT. Twenty-seven patients with residual tumor after surgery received RT (22 of them during the post-operative period and 5 after an interval of several yr: 3 because of increased tumor size and 2 with stable residual lesion); tumors in 14 of these patients decreased in size, 11 appeared to be stable on imaging and one patient showed some increase in tumor size (one patient was not followed-up). The residual tumors of the 2 non-irradiated patients remained stable after 5 and 7 yr, respectively. Twenty-two patients without residual disease after surgery (11 with post-operative irradiation, 1 with RT 5 yr after transsphenoidal surgery because of tumor recurrence, and 10 without RT) have shown no evidence of tumor regrowth on serial images.

CONCLUSIONS:

Radiotherapy can be avoided in patients with complete macroscopic resection and absence of residual tumor in post-operative images; they must be carefully followed using imaging techniques and, in the case of recurrence, they should be re-operated and/or irradiated.

PMID:
15816366
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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