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Bone. 1992;13(1):41-9.

Primary hyperparathyroidism: iliac crest trabecular bone volume, structure, remodeling, and balance evaluated by histomorphometric methods.

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  • 1Surgical Department I, Arhus Amtssygehus, Denmark.

Abstract

Iliac bone biopsies from 69 patients (48 females, 21 males; median age 58 years; range 17-79 years) with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) were examined, and static histomorphometric parameters compared to 30 age- and sex-matched normal controls. The control group for the dynamic parameters constituted 20 sex-matched younger normal controls. Fractional volume of trabecular bone was normal, but the trabeculae were thinner (p less than 0.05) in PHP. The structural parameters marrow space star volume, intertrabecular distance, and mean trabecular plate density were not significantly different in PHP patients compared to normal controls, but the age-related increase, for females, in marrow space star volume and decrease, for both sexes, in mean plate density observed in the controls were not noticed in the PHP group. Trabecular bone remodeling was found significantly increased in the PHP patients reflected by increased extension of eroded (p less than 0.001), osteoid (p less than 0.001), and labeled surfaces (p less than 0.05). The activation frequency was increased by approximately 50% (p less than 0.001). Neither PHP patients nor controls showed age-related decrease in trabecular thickness, and accordingly in both groups the bone balance per remodeling cycle was very close to and not significantly different from zero. Normal postmenopausal women (age greater than or equal to 50 yr) had lower trabecular bone volume (p less than 0.001) and higher intertrabecular distance than normal pre-menopausal women (age less than 50 yr).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
1581108
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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