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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005 Apr;159(4):384-8.

Early cognitive stimulation, emotional support, and television watching as predictors of subsequent bullying among grade-school children.

Author information

1
Department of Health Services, Child Health Institute, University of Washington, 6200 NE 74th Street, Suite 210, Seattle, WA 98115-8160, USA. fzimmer@u.washington.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bullying is a major public health issue, the risk factors for which are poorly understood.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether cognitive stimulation, emotional support, and television viewing at age 4 years are independently associated with being a bully at ages 6 through 11 years.

METHODS:

We used multivariate logistic regression, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, to adjust for multiple confounding factors.

RESULTS:

Parental cognitive stimulation and emotional support at age 4 years were each independently protective against bullying, with a significant odds ratio of 0.67 for both variables associated with a 1-SD increase (95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.82 for cognitive stimulation and 0.54-0.84 for emotional support). Each hour of television viewed per day at age 4 years was associated with a significant odds ratio of 1.06 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.11) for subsequent bullying. These findings persisted when we controlled for bullying behavior at age 4 years in a subsample of children for whom this measure was available.

CONCLUSION:

The early home environment, including cognitive stimulation, emotional support, and exposure to television, has a significant impact on bullying in grade school.

PMID:
15809395
DOI:
10.1001/archpedi.159.4.384
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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