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Pediatr Radiol. 2005 Jun;35(6):619-23. Epub 2005 Apr 2.

Squalene aspiration pneumonia in children: radiographic and CT findings as the first clue to diagnosis.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The diagnosis of squalene aspiration pneumonia in children is often difficult because of minimal non-specific symptoms.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the radiological findings of squalene aspiration pneumonia in children.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We reviewed the chest radiographs (n = 8) and CT scans (n = 7), including high-resolution CT (n = 3), of eight patients (four boys, four girls; age 3 months to 6 years) with squalene aspiration pneumonia. All patients presented minimal symptoms.

RESULTS:

Chest radiographs showed right-sided predominantly parahilar infiltrations. The extent and the opacity of the lesions decreased slowly during the follow-up period (mean 5.4 months) after halting the exposure. On CT, affected areas appeared as dense consolidations surrounded by ground-glass opacities showing a crazy-paving pattern in a geographic lobular distribution in all patients. The lesions were predominantly in the right lung and dependent areas in all patients and extensively involved all pulmonary lobes in five patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

These radiological findings, although non-specific, can lead to an appropriate diagnosis, particularly when patients present few symptoms.

PMID:
15806404
DOI:
10.1007/s00247-005-1439-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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