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Nat Rev Immunol. 2005 Apr;5(4):296-306.

Dendritic cells as therapeutic vaccines against cancer.

Author information

1
Baylor Institute for Immunology Research, 3434 Live Oak, Dallas, Texas 75204, USA. jacquesb@baylorhealth.edu

Abstract

Mouse studies have shown that the immune system can reject tumours, and the identification of tumour antigens that can be recognized by human T cells has facilitated the development of immunotherapy protocols. Vaccines against cancer aim to induce tumour-specific effector T cells that can reduce the tumour mass, as well as tumour-specific memory T cells that can control tumour relapse. Owing to their capacity to regulate T-cell immunity, dendritic cells are increasingly used as adjuvants for vaccination, and the immunogenicity of antigens delivered by dendritic cells has now been shown in patients with cancer. A better understanding of how dendritic cells regulate immune responses will allow us to better exploit these cells to induce effective antitumour immunity.

PMID:
15803149
DOI:
10.1038/nri1592
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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