Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;186:302-7.

Negative self-schemas and the onset of depression in women: longitudinal study.

Author information

  • 1Division of Psychiatry, University of Bristol, Cotham House, Cotham Hill, Bristol BS6 6JL, UK. j.evans@bristol.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Beck's cognitive theory of depression has received little empirical support.

AIMS:

To test whether those with negative self-schemas were at risk of onset of depression.

METHOD:

Data were collected by postal questionnaire from 12,003 women recruited during early pregnancy; questionnaires included measures of depressive symptoms and negative self-schemas. Regular questionnaires were sent during pregnancy and following childbirth.

RESULTS:

Of 8540 women not depressed when recruited, 8.6% (95% CI 8.0-9.2) became depressed 14 weeks later. Those in the highest tertile for negative self-schema score were more likely to become depressed than those in the lowest tertile (odds ratio 3.04, 95% CI 2.48-3.73). The association remained after adjustment for baseline depressive symptoms and previous depression (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.27-2.02) and was of similar magnitude for onset 3 years later.

CONCLUSIONS:

Holding a negative self-schema is an independent risk factor for the onset of depression in women. This finding supports a key element of Beck's cognitive theory. Understanding more about how negative self-schemas arise should help inform preventive policies.

Comment in

PMID:
15802686
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.186.4.302
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center