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Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;186:281-9.

Pathways to care and ethnicity. 1: Sample characteristics and compulsory admission. Report from the AESOP study.

Author information

1
Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. spjucrm@iop.kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many studies have found high levels of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospital in the UK among African-Caribbean and Black African patients with a psychotic illness.

AIMS:

To establish whether African-Caribbean and Black African ethnicity is associated with compulsory admission in an epidemiological sample of patients with a first episode of psychosis drawn from two UK centres.

METHOD:

All patients with a first episode of psychosis who made contact with psychiatric services over a 2-year period and were living in defined areas were included in the (AESOP) study. For this analysis we included all White British, other White, African-Caribbean and Black African patients from the AESOP sampling frame. Clinical, socio-demographic and pathways to care data were collected from patients, relatives and case notes.

RESULTS:

African-Caribbean patients were significantly more likely to be compulsorily admitted than White British patients, as were Black African patients. African-Caribbean men were the most likely to be compulsorily admitted.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that factors are operating at or prior to first presentation to increase the risk of compulsory admission among African-Caribbean and Black African patients.

PMID:
15802683
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.186.4.281
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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