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Evid Based Dent. 2005;6(1):20.

Multiple idiopathic cervical root resorption most frequently seen in younger females.

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  • 1Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

DATA SOURCES:

Medline and references of included studies were used to source articles.

STUDY SELECTION:

Selected articles were case reports or reviews of patients who had multiple root resorption with no systemic or local factors that may have contributed to root resorption, the resorption originating at the cemento-enamel junction of teeth and involving more than three teeth in the dentition.

DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS:

Clinical, histological and historical findings are summarised for all identified patients.

RESULTS:

Multiple idiopathic cervical root resorption (MICRR) was an incidental finding on routine clinical and radiographic examination. There appeared to be no correlation between this type of resorption and any medical or dental finding. Radiographically, MICRR was found to begin at the cemento-enamel junction and then either progress to involve the entire cervical region or, at some point, spontaneously arrest. Those cases that progressed to involve the entire cervical region required extraction. The number of teeth that demonstrated this condition ranged from five up to 24 per patient. More teeth became involved as the condition was followed in time. There was no detectable frequency of occurrence for any particular dental region or tooth among the involved teeth. Of a total of 18 patients, 13 were females whose ages ranged from 7 to 68 years of age. Ten of the 18 patients were Caucasian.

CONCLUSIONS:

Multiple idiopathic cervical root resorption was found most frequently associated with younger females. This condition appeared to be of unknown aetiology and uncertain natural history.

PMID:
15789048
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ebd.6400308
[PubMed]

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