Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2005 Apr;98(4):1280-5.

Resistance training increases total daily energy expenditure in disabled older women with coronary heart disease.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Dept. of Medicine, McClure 1 Cardiology, Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT 05401, USA. philip.ades@vtmednet.org

Abstract

Physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) is a determinant of prognosis and fitness in older patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). PAEE and total energy expenditure (TEE) are closely related to fatness, physical function, and metabolic risk in older individuals. The goal of this study was to assess effects of resistance training on PAEE, TEE, and fitness in older women with chronic CHD and physical activity limitations (N = 51, mean age: 72 + 5 yr). The study intervention consisted of a progressive, 6-mo program of resistance training vs. a control group condition of low-intensity yoga and deep breathing. The study interventions were completed by 42 of the 51 participants. The intervention group manifested a 177 +/- 213 kcal/day (+9%) increase in TEE, pre- to posttraining, measured by the doubly labeled water technique during a nonexercise 10-day period (P < 0.03 vs. controls). This was due to a 50 +/- 74 kcal/day (4%) increase in resting metabolic rate measured by indirect calorimetry (P < 0.01, P < 0.05 vs. controls) and a 123 +/- 214 kcal/day (9%) increase in PAEE (P < 0.03, P = 0.12 vs. controls). Resistance training was associated with significant increases in upper and lower body strength, but no change in fat-free mass, measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry, or left ventricular function, measured by echocardiography and Doppler. Women in the control group showed no alterations in TEE or its determinants. There were no changes between groups in body composition, aerobic capacity, or measures of mental depression. These results demonstrate that resistance training of 6-mo duration leads to an increase in TEE and PAEE in older women with chronic CHD.

PMID:
15772059
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.00360.2004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center