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Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2005 Mar 15;21(6):623-32.

Review article: hepatitis C virus infection and type-2 diabetes mellitus in renal diseases and transplantation.

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1
Division of Nephrology and Dialysis, Maggiore Hospital, IRCCS, 15 Milan, Italy. fabrizi@policlinico.mi.it

Abstract

A link between hepatitis C virus infection and development of diabetes mellitus has been suggested by many investigators; however, this remains controversial. The mechanisms underlying the association between hepatitis C virus and diabetes mellitus are unclear but a great majority of clinical surveys have found a significant and independent relationship between hepatitis C virus and diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation and orthotopic liver transplantation. We have systematically reviewed the scientific literature to explore the association between hepatitis C virus and diabetes mellitus in end-stage renal disease; in addition, data on patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation were also analysed. The unadjusted odds ratio for developing post-transplant diabetes mellitus in hepatitis C virus-infected renal transplant recipients ranged between 1.58 and 16.5 across the published studies. The rate of anti-hepatitis C virus antibody in serum was higher among dialysis patients having diabetes mellitus (odds ratio 9.9; 95% confidence interval 2.663-32.924). Patients with type-2 diabetes-related glomerulonephritis had the highest anti-hepatitis C virus prevalence [19.5% (24/123) vs. 3.2% (73/2247); P < 0.001] in a large cohort of Japanese patients who underwent renal biopsy. The link between hepatitis C virus and diabetes mellitus may explain, in part, the detrimental role of hepatitis C virus on patient and graft survival after orthotopic liver transplantation and/or renal transplantation. Preliminary evidence suggests that anti-viral therapies prior to renal transplantation and novel immunosuppressive regimens may lower the occurrence of diabetes mellitus in hepatitis C virus-infected patients after renal transplantation. Clinical trials are under way to assess if the hepatitis C virus-linked predisposition to new onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation may be reduced by newer immunosuppressive medications.

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