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Exp Neurol. 1992 May;116(2):198-203.

Reverberatory seizure discharges in hippocampal-parahippocampal circuits.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22908.

Abstract

Previously, a unique type of epileptiform discharge, recorded in the dentate gyrus, has been identified and termed maximal dentate activation. Maximal dentate activation is defined by the presence of bursts of large amplitude population spikes, associated with a secondary rise in the extracellular potassium and a negative shift of the dc potential. Prior work has linked maximal dentate activation to lengthening of afterdischarges when they are elicited in the hippocampus or outside of the hippocampus in the amygdala. The current study used two approaches to further examine the relationship of maximal dentate activation to seizures in limbic circuits in urethane-anesthetized rats. First, simultaneous recordings were employed to document that during maximal dentate activation, synchronous discharges occurred in the dentate gyrus, cornu Ammonis, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. From anatomical work, these structures are known to be connected in a hippocampal-parahippocampal loop. The second approach used lesions of the entorhinal cortex to document the importance of this loop in the initiation and maintenance of maximal dentate activation. Both electrolytic and chemical (focal injections of tetrodotoxin) lesions of the entorhinal cortex blocked maximal dentate activation on the side of the lesion. However, maximal dentate activation was maintained on the opposite side, where the hippocampal-parahippocampal loop was intact. Altogether, these data support the hypothesis that maximal dentate activation is a marker for the presence of reverberatory, synchronized paroxysmal activity throughout the hippocampal-parahippocampal loop and that this loop behaves as a unit in epileptogenesis.

PMID:
1577127
DOI:
10.1016/0014-4886(92)90168-p
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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