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Am J Ophthalmol. 2005 Mar;139(3):553-4.

Corneal thickness and axial length.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, New York, New York, USA. MShimmyo@aol.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

A thin central cornea has been reported to be a risk factor for developing primary open-angle glaucoma among ocular hypertensive eyes. A thin scleral bed of lamina cribrosa seen in deeply excavated optic nerves in glaucomatous eyes is a quintessential finding in advanced glaucomatous eyes. Association between thin cornea and weak sclera contributing to vulnerability of lamina cribrosa has been postulated. The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is an association between corneal thickness and axial length of human eyes in a clinical setting.

DESIGN:

This is an observational, retrospective cross-sectional study.

METHODS:

The ocular parameters of 1,084 consecutive eyes with both corneal thickness and axial length measurements were analyzed and compared by age, gender, and race.

RESULTS:

In the total patient study group, there was no statistically significant association between central corneal thickness and axial length. Subgroup analysis by age, gender, and race also failed to show an association.

CONCLUSIONS:

Central corneal thickness and axial length are independent occurrences. Thin corneas are not associated with longer eyes.

PMID:
15767076
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2004.08.061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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