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Eur J Nutr. 2006 Feb;45(1):1-6. Epub 2005 Mar 22.

Can changes in hydrophobicity increase the bioavailability of alpha-tocopherol?

Author information

1
University of Hohenheim, Institute of Biological Chemistry and Nutrition, Garbenstr. 30, 70593 Stuttgart, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bioavailability of fat-soluble vitamins from conventional oral supplements is insufficient in some conditions in which fat digestion and absorption are chronically impaired (e. g. cystic fibrosis).

AIM OF THE STUDY:

We used a water-soluble form of fatsoluble vitamin E (AQUANOVA solubilisate) to create a nutritional supplement (NS) in the form of vitaminized gummi bears (with micellised water-soluble alpha-tocopheryl acetate (100 IU) and 400 mg crystalline vitamin C). We assessed the bioavailability of the NS in comparison to conventional preparations.

METHODS:

The trial consisted of three study days (d0: NS sucked; d10: NS swallowed; d20: reference products swallowed). A total of 14 subjects (6 male/8 female), aged 25.3 (22.7-35.3) years, BMI 24.3 (19.0-31.7) kg/m(2) participated in the study. They had blood samples drawn after fasting for >or=12 hours and then 1, 5, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 320 minutes after ingesting the vitamins. HPLC and a colorimetric method were used to determine vitamin E and vitamin C, respectively. Areas under the curve (AUC(0-320min)) and maximum increases in plasma concentrations (Delta concentration) were calculated to assess bioavailability.

RESULTS:

The AUCs(0-320min) of alpha-tocopherol from d0 were significantly larger (p = 0.016) when compared to d20. Moreover, the maximum increase in alpha-tocopherol plasma concentrations was significantly higher for d0 (p = 0.023) and d10 (p = 0.002) when compared to d20.

CONCLUSIONS:

Short-term bioavailability of AQUANOVA micellised fat-soluble vitamin E from our NS was significantly higher than from regular supplements. The NS will now be tested for its clinical efficacy in a randomized double-blind controlled intervention trial with CF patients.

PMID:
15765200
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-005-0556-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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